Articles Under: Adult Faith Formation

This is a paid advertisement in the April- June 2019 issue. Advertisements should not be viewed as endorsements from the publisher. To order the book or for more information from Ave Maria Press click here or call (800) 282-1865, ext. 1.Read more
Life is a Journey We are on a journey. Our life, we know, is not meant to be static. It is rather an ever-deepening growth in union with the God who created us. He deliberately left an emptiness within us, a chasm, a desire. That longing is an invitation to set out and begin to seek God, to develop a relationship with him, which grows and develops in stages. If you look at books on the interior life, you will notice that they are riddled, if not titled, with words such as navigating, journey, passages, heights, depths, valleys, nights ... Read more
Since becoming Catholic in 2004, I have encountered many, many Catholics who do not understand grace, salvation, or how they are granted access to heaven. Many have revealed they live in fear of going to hell because of some unknown, unconfessed sin or that their understanding of how they are saved is solely based on their works. These Catholics do not understand how faith and works relate to salvation. In short, they do not understand the source of their salvation. Dr. Peter Kreeft explains the problem in his book, Catholics and Protestants: What Can We Learn from Each Other? [1]... Read more
Introduction Over the last several decades, theologians who focus on evangelization in general, and the moment of catechesis within it in particular, have given considerable thought and attention to the topic of the kerygma, and rightly so. The kerygma can be aptly understood to be the summary of the Gospel; and, as such, it is always deserving of closer study, especially so in an age when Catholicism is waning in many places. In this three-part series, I’m explaining what the kerygma is and why it’s important. In the first installment, I provided a basic overview of the kerygma, identifying seven... Read more
There are few things more likely to earn one the label of “bigot” than publicly to propose the Catholic Church’s teaching on homosexuality and transgenderism. I take a “bigot” to be someone who tenaciously holds a position but has no sound reasons for his stance and is, additionally, mean-spirited. Here, I want to show that the Catholic position on homosexuality and transgenderism is not bigoted because there are good and solid reasons for it and, equally important, it is a gentle, if firm position. I will also include here what the Church teaches on fornication, in light of the burgeoning... Read more
To view Death and the Miser online click here . The artist Hieronymus Bosch is a mystery of Art History. His role in the Northern Renaissance has made him a curiosity who has been admired, copied, and perhaps disdained as a madman. His paintings are fantastical always and religious usually, but religious in a unique, sometimes troubling and psychologically dark manner. He left no written documents or letters that might explain his ideas about painting, but he is mentioned in the archives of the Illustrious Brotherhood of Our Blessed Lady, a Netherlandish religious confraternity. His father was an artist, as... Read more
Fortitude is a virtue that is admired by even the non-religious. Even people who think temperance is for the overly pious, consider meekness a weakness, and scoff at humility believe that fortitude is a laudable attribute. For thousands of years, cultures have honored the courageous, recognizing the hero that finds the balanced mean between fear and impetuousness. As C. S. Lewis notes in The Screwtape Letters , people are “proud of most vices, but not of cowardice.” The Catechism tells us, “Fortitude is the moral virtue that ensures firmness in difficulties and constancy in the pursuit of the good. It... Read more
A Chinese proverb says: “man without virtue is the ‘non-man.’” This is a very radical statement, one which is politically incorrect. It is a statement that shocks our contemporary egalitarian obsession. Yet, even though the statement is rather offensive to our ears, it seems to resonate in the depth of our soul. Why? Joseph Pieper in his book entitled Faith, Hope, Love suggests the answer by stating that virtue is the “enhancement of the human person,” “the most a man can be.” “It is the realization of man’s potentiality for being. It is a perfection of his activity,” and “the... Read more
As we reflect in this issue of The Catechetical Review on “living the virtues,” we recall St. Paul’s words that faith, hope, and love remain, “but the greatest of these is love” (1 Cor 13:13). For the benefit of our catechetical readers, we are reprinting here the homily of his Holiness for the meeting of reflection and spirituality, “Mediterranean: Frontier of Peace” in Bari, Italy on February 23, 2020. Pope Francis inspires and challenges us all to live the same life of love Jesus called us to in the Sermon on the Mount. Click here for Spanish. Jesus quotes the... Read more
Last year while preparing to speak at a diocesan event on Catholic Social Teachings (henceforth CST) I came across a link on the USCCB website that offered a series of quotes from Pope Francis on the CST. Thinking I might find a pithy quote to use in my address, I opened the file only to find that it contained an overwhelming 378 pages of statements from our Holy Father on various aspects of the CST. Following in the footsteps of Pope Benedict XVI, Pope St. John Paul II, and the other Popes of the modern period, Pope Francis has tirelessly... Read more