Inspired through Art

For teachers, who understand the power of visual meditation and learning, the Inspired through Art series provide ample opportunities to teach the faith with stunningly beautiful and intriguing images. The series is a type of "cross-curriculum" of art history and catechetics, where pre-teen to adult students learn about the artist, the art form and the lesson of faith presented in the work of art. Every print issue's centerfold has a full-color spread of various art forms from different periods. 

And you'll be surprised at what some of the works of art teach, and at how deeply the artists meditated on the subject they were presenting! What may appear to be irrelevant details, may be very relevant. For example, in the art carousel on the home page, there is an image of the Last Supper (the actual translation from Italian, the Ultimate Supper). Answer to "What does the peacock in the window represent?" is: immortality. Read the article and find out why.

In the past, some teachers have laminated the centerfold in order to present the art in class. Now, more and more people are using computer projection technology to make it easier for students to see and follow along with the lesson. With a subscription to The Catechetical Review, people can also go online to back issues of the magazines they have missed and utilize many different works of art to teach the faith or to use as a backdrop to a time of prayer and meditation, for example at the beginning a class to aid students in putting themselves in the presence of God.

The text articles may be downloaded and reproduced in order to facilitate group studies. Try a sample for free here.

Answer to "Can you guess which saint this is?" on the home page: St. Michael the Archangel, by modern artist Michael O'Brien of Canada.

Articles from the Most Recent Issue

Editor's Reflections: Our Life's Purpose—Entering the Life of the Trinity
By Dr. James Pauley
Free In what is perhaps the most foundational statement in all the Catechism of the Catholic Church , we read something puzzling: “The ultimate end of the whole divine economy is the entry of God's creatures into the perfect unity of the Blessed Trinity.” [1] We can easily embrace the part about God, but what about God’s creatures entering into the “... Read more
Light from Light
By Dr. Tracey Rowland
The phrases “God from God” and “Light from Light” are used in the Nicene Creed which is recited at every Sunday Mass. In Latin, the phrase “Light from Light” is lumen de lumine. The phrase appears in the very first section of the Creed: "I believe in one God, the Father almighty, maker of heaven and earth, of all things visible and invisible. I... Read more
The Eucharist: Who, When, What, Why, and Where? Part 2
By Peter Kreeft
n our previous issue, Dr. Kreeft explored several important issues that arise when we consider the questions of “who” and “when” as they relate to Christ in the Eucharist. In this article, he will examine three final questions, to help us better understand the Church’s teaching concerning our Eucharistic Lord. What? What activity is Christ... Read more

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